Frequently Asked COVID-19 Vaccine Questions

Quarantine & Isolation After Vaccination

I’ve had my first COVID-19 vaccine dose, but now I’m a close contact, do I still need to quarantine?


Yes. If you have only received one dose of COVID-19 vaccine you still need to quarantine if you have been exposed to COVID-19 and are considered a close contact. This is the standard procedure recommended by the CDC.

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If I’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 do I still need to quarantine?


No, so long as they meet the following critieria: To be considered "fully vaccinated" a person has to have had their final COVID-19 vaccine dose two or more weeks from their day of exposure to COVID-19. To avoid quarantine one must --Be fully vaccinated. --Be within 90 days of receiving their last dose of vaccine. --Remained asymptomatic since they've been exposed. --Are currently NOT hospitalized or in a long-term care facility. If a vaccinated person does not meet the above criteria they will need to quarantine.

Note – MCCHD is requiring emailed documentation of the completed vaccine series, once documentation is received and confirmed by our team, individuals will be formerly released from quarantine and offered a release from quarantine letter.

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If I’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and test positive do I need to isolate?


Yes, the CDC does not yet know if those who are fully vaccinated can still transmit the virus to others and they recommend that those who are fully vaccinated isolate if they contract COVID-19.




If I’ve received one COVID-19 vaccine dose and test positive do I need to isolate?


Yes, one dose does not provide full protection against COVID-19, so if you contract COVID-19 after getting one dose you will need to isolate to ensure you don’t pass on the virus to others.




If a person gets vaccinated and still needs to quarantine or isolate then what is the purpose of getting vaccinated?


The CDC says we need to use all the tools in our arsenal to stop this pandemic. Folks getting vaccinated on top of the current tools (masks, social distancing, capacity limits, etc.) is the quickest way to get the virus out of our community and resume our normal lives. These are all pieces of the puzzle that work together to protect our community in the interim and long term.





V-SAFE

What is v-safe?


V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that uses text messaging and web surveys to provide personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Through v-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Depending on your answers, someone from CDC may call to check on you and get more information. And v-safe will remind you to get your second COVID-19 vaccine dose if you need one. <gdiv></gdiv>




I do not have a smart phone, how can I enroll in v-safe?


You will need a smartphone with a modern browser and access to the internet to participate.




Is v-safe free?


Yes.




How do I stop participating in v-safe?


Participation is voluntary and you can opt out at any time. To opt out, simply text “STOP” when v-safe sends you a text message. You can also start v-safe again by texting “START.”




Is there a time limit to sign up for v-safe?


If you would like to participate in v-safe, you must sign up within 42 days of getting your first COVID-19 vaccine dose.




How long do v-safe check-ins last?


During the first week after you get your vaccine, v-safe will send you a text message each day to ask how you are doing. Then you will get check-in messages once a week for up to 5 weeks. The questions v-safe asks take less than 5 minutes to answer. If you need a second dose of vaccine, v-safe will provide a new 6-week check-in process so you can share your second-dose vaccine experience as well. Finally, you’ll receive check-ins 3, 6, and 12 months after your final dose of vaccine.




Is my health information safe on v-safe?


Yes. Your personal information in v-safe is protected so that it stays confidential and private. To the extent v–safe uses existing information systems managed by CDC, FDA, and other federal agencies, the systems employ strict security measures appropriate for the data’s level of sensitivity.




How does my participation in v-safe make a difference?


By participating in v-safe, you can tell CDC if you have any side effects after a COVID-19 vaccine. This information helps CDC monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in near real time. If any serious health problems are reported, they can be quickly investigated by CDC’s medical experts and scientists. In addition, traditional vaccine safety systems, such as Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD), will also be used to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. These systems are part of the nation’s comprehensive approach to vaccine safety.




What if I have a health problem I think is related to my COVID-19 vaccination between v-safe check-ins or after I’ve finished v-safe?


If at any time you have symptoms or health problems following COVID-19 vaccination that concern you, please contact your healthcare provider. In addition to your participation in v-safe, you can also report your experience to VAERS.





Allergic Reactions

How do I report a bad reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine?


If you experience side effects (called adverse events), you should contact the provider you received the vaccine from. Healthcare providers will be required to report certain adverse events following vaccination to Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Healthcare providers also must adhere to any revised safety reporting requirements according to FDA’s conditions of authorized use throughout the duration of any Emergency Use Authorization; these requirements would be posted on FDA’s website. CDC is also implementing a new smartphone-based tool called v-safe to check-in on people’s health after they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. When you receive your vaccine, you should also receive a v-safe information sheet telling you how to enroll in v-safe. If you enroll, you will receive regular text messages directing you to surveys where you can report any problems or adverse reactions you have after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.




How do I know if I am at risk for anaphylaxis shock from the COVID-19 vaccine?


The CDC recommends that residents who have allergies that are unrelated to vaccines or injectable therapies get vaccinated. If you have ever had an immediate allergic reaction to a vaccine or injectable therapy, ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Residents with allergies unrelated to vaccines and injectable therapies should still get vaccinated. People who are allergic to PEG or polysorbate should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. If you have additional concerns about allergens of your reaction to vaccines, your doctor is your best resource to advise if you should get the COVID-19 vaccine.









Safety Before, During and After Vaccination

Do I still need to wear a mask and social distance once I get both vaccine doses?


Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, and staying at least 6 feet away from others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations for how to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on steps everyone should take to slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.




Do I still need to wear a mask while getting the vaccine?


Yes. CDC recommends that during the pandemic people wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth when in contact with others outside your household, when in healthcare facilities, and when receiving any vaccine, including a COVID-19 vaccine.




I just recently got another vaccine, is it okay for me to still get a COVID-19 vaccine?


The CDC recommends individuals do not get any other vaccine two weeks before or two weeks following their COVID-19 vaccination. This applies to the first dose and the booster dose.




Is it safe for me to get the COVID-19 vaccine if I have an underlying health condition?


Residents with underlying health conditions can receive the COVID-19 vaccine provided they have not had an immediate allergic reaction to other vaccines or injectable therapies. Vaccination is an important consideration for those with underlying conditions due to their increased risk of complications due to COVID-19. You can learn more about vaccination considerations for persons with underlying medical conditions.




Are existing vaccines effective against the new strains of COVID-19?


In an alert sent to all health care providers, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration noted data suggests current COVID-19 vaccines are still effective against the latest reported variations of the virus.




Is my second dose guaranteed?


DPHHS plans for second doses when they administer first doses to a vaccine distributors. They have a system in place to make sure there will be a second dose for you. Most vaccine distributors in the county will schedule your second dose during your appointment for your first dose. If your provider hasn't mentioned a process for your second dose appointment, before or during your first dose appointment, you should reach out to them and get clarification on their process for booking second dose appointments.





Child, Pregnant, Breastfeeding Vaccination Questions

Will a COVID-19 vaccine be available to children?


The CDC says the initial COVID-19 vaccines will not be available to children. Children have vastly different immune systems than adults, and at this time not enough research has been done to determine the efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine in children. Both Moderna and Pfizer recently started vaccine trials in children, but it is unknown when children will be cleared to get vaccinated.




I am pregnant, is it okay for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine?


People who are pregnant and fall under an eligible phase to receive COVID-19 vaccine, may choose to be vaccinated. A conversation between pregnant patients and their clinicians may help them decide whether to get vaccinated with a vaccine that has been authorized for use under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). While a conversation with a healthcare provider may be helpful, it is not required prior to vaccination. Key considerations pregnant patients can discuss with their healthcare provider include: -The likelihood of exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 -Risks of COVID-19 to them and potential risks to their fetuses -What is known about the vaccine: how well it works to develop protection in the body, known side effects of the vaccine, and lack of data during pregnancy.




I am breastfeeding, is it okay for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine?


There is no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or on the effects of mRNA vaccines on the breastfed infant or on milk production/excretion. mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to the breastfeeding infant. People who are breastfeeding and are part of an eligible phase to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, may choose to be vaccinated.





Vaccine Phases

What is Missoula County’s approach for phase 1b?


Missoula is following the Montana Department of Health and Human Services phases. Phase 1b includes residents over the age of 70, American Indians and other people of color who may be at an elevated risk for COVID-19, residents aged 16-69 with qualifying health conditions, and--on a case-by-case basis--medical providers may include a resident with a health condition that puts them at elevated risk. At a Missoula City-County Board of Health (BOH) meeting on January 14th, 2021, the BOH adopting an approach to organizing vaccination within phase 1b, as we continue to have limited doses. The first group to be allowed vaccination within phase 1b will be those ages 70 and older. Due to the large section of the population phase 1b covers, Missoula’s coordination effort relies on multiple distribution points. The Office of Emergency Management is coordinating with each distribution point to equitably and efficiently offer the vaccine to residents who want it in phase 1b. The Missoula City-County Health Department will work with partners to offer mass clinics to residents whose primary care providers do not have a distribution plan.




How many people in Missoula County will be eligible in phase 1b?


According to rough estimates we gathered from U.S. Census data and other sources, we currently believe up to 34,000 Missoula County residents will be eligible for phase 1b. We will update this figure when we refine our research.




What sort of essential workers will qualify for vaccination in phase 1c?


Phase 1c will include essential workers including teachers, grocery store clerks, postal workers, utility workers, etc. This list will likely become clarified by state and local leadership in the coming months.




Do student dormitories count as a congregate home for phase 1c?


No, DPHHS has not designated student dormitories as congregate homes at this point.




When will there be enough vaccines for everyone?


Montana DPHHS estimates there will be enough vaccine doses for everyone, 16 and older, in Montana by late spring or early summer 2021. This timeline is fluid and subject to vaccine availability.




I heard ski patrol are getting vaccinated but not EMS. Is this hearsay?


This is hearsay. EMS and first responders are eligible for vaccination under phase 1a. If you know an EMS that wants to get vaccinated send them to missoulainfo.com/vaccination and they can sign up on our website.




For phase 1b, do I have to currently have cancer to qualify, or do I qualify if I have a history of cancer?


Cancer is a qualifying condition regardless of what type a person has/had or when they had it.




Will I need documentation of my qualifying illness to get vaccinated in phase 1b or phase 1c?


No, but you will be screened for qualifying conditions and must attest that the information you provide is factual.




I am a person of color, does the vaccine 1b age restriction passed by the Board of Health apply to me?


No, persons of color and Native Americans are eligible throughout phase 1B.





General

What are mRNA vaccines?


mRNA vaccines carry genetic material that teaches our cells how to make a harmless piece of “spike protein,” which is found on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The genetic material from the vaccine is destroyed by our cells once copies of the spike protein are made and it is no longer needed. Our cells display this piece of spike protein on their surface, and an immune response is triggered inside our bodies. This produces antibodies to protect us from getting infected if the SARS-CoV-2 virus enters our bodies. mRNA vaccines do not affect our DNA; mRNA does not enter the cell nucleus. mRNA vaccines cannot give someone COVID-19. These mRNA vaccines use technology that is new but not unknown. mRNA vaccines have been studied for influenza, Zika, rabies, and cytomegalovirus (CMV).




How was the vaccine development timeline accelerated while ensuring safety?


Researchers used existing clinical trial networks to begin conducting COVID-19 vaccine trials. Manufacturing was started while the clinical trials were still underway. Normally, manufacturing doesn’t begin until after completion of the trials. mRNA vaccines are faster to produce than traditional vaccines. FDA and CDC are prioritizing review, authorization, and recommendation of COVID-19 vaccines.




How long will my COVID-19 vaccine be effective for?


The CDC is still working to figure out how long both the Pfizer and Modern COVID-19 vaccines will be effective for. At this point, it is unclear if people will need to get a COVID-19 vaccine yearly.




What is the Missoula County COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Team’s role in vaccine distribution?


The Missoula County COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Team is not receiving its own allocations of vaccine. The team is composed of Office of Emergency Management Employees, who often work on natural disasters. This team is acting as a coordinating partner for vaccine distributors to help them set up mass clinics and plans to help connect eligible people with vaccine providers.




Is there a difference between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines?


Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are RNA-based vaccines that will require two doses. The Pfizer vaccine doses must be taken 3 weeks apart; the Moderna doses, four weeks apart. These second doses will not be interchangeable. For example, if someone gets a Pfizer vaccine first they will need Pfizer for their second dose. Studies show the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are 94% to 95% effective once both doses have been administered and had time to take effect in the body.




How long will the vaccine take to kick in?


The CDC says vaccines take a few weeks to “kick in”. In those weeks, your body is building an immune response against the virus. While a single dose of COVID-19 vaccine will provide a small amount of immunity, the second booster dose is critical for a person to get their maximum protection against COVID-19.




If I have had COVID-19, do I still need to get the vaccine?


According to the CDC, “Due to the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long. We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have a vaccine and more data on how well it works.”




Will a COVID-19 vaccine give me COVID-19?


Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines do not use the live virus that causes COVID-19, so they cannot give people COVID-19. However, the goal for each vaccine is to teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.




Will a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive on a COVID-19 test?


According to the CDC, “Vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States won’t cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. If your body develops an immune response, which is the goal of vaccination, there is a possibility you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.”




What is the purpose of getting a COVID-19 vaccine?


According to the CDC, “While many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness or they may even die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you are not at increased risk of severe complications. If you get sick, you also may spread the disease to friends, family, and others around you while you are sick. COVID-19 vaccination helps protect you by creating an antibody response without having to experience sickness. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.”




Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?


According to the CDC, “mRNA stands for messenger ribonucleic acid and can most easily be described as instructions for how to make a protein or even just a piece of a protein. mRNA is not able to alter or modify a person’s genetic makeup (DNA). The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enter the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA are kept. This means the mRNA does not affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 vaccines that use mRNA work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop protection (immunity) to disease. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work.”




Will the vaccine be free?


You won't have to pay for the vaccine itself. The CDC confirms vaccine doses purchased with U.S. Taxpayer dollars will be free to the public. However, you may be asked to pay for costs, mostly staff, that are needed to administer the vaccine. If you have insurance, a claim can be filed by your provider to recoup a small fee from your insurance provider for costs associated with administering the vaccine. This fee will not be passed on to you. Whether you have insurance or not, you will not need to pay for the COVID-19 vaccine.




If masks and social distancing work, why do I need the vaccine?


The CDC says stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.




What percentage of the population needs to get vaccinated for herd immunity?


Experts do not know what percentage of people would need to get vaccinated to achieve herd immunity to COVID-19. Herd immunity is a term used to describe when enough people have protection—either from previous infection or vaccination—that it is unlikely a virus or bacteria can spread and cause disease. As a result, everyone within the community is protected even if some people don’t have any protection themselves. The percentage of people who need to have protection in order to achieve herd immunity varies by disease.




If your doctor is in Missoula and you live in a different county, can you get immunized in Missoula County?


If your doctor is in Missoula and has chosen to give COVID-19 vaccines, you may be able to get vaccinated by your doctor even if you live out of county.

You will NOT be eligible, however, for vaccines administered by the Missoula City-County Health Department and the mass vaccine clinics it may offer.




I am an American Indian, where should I get vaccinated?


You will be eligible at All Nations Health Center, which is currently vaccinating elders, and at any of Missoula City-County Health Department COVID-19 vaccine clinics. Your private health care provider may also be registered to give COVID-19 vaccine.




I lost my COVID-19 vaccine card, how can I replace it or prove I have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine?


You should contact the provider who administered your first dose. You will need/want to replace the card which includes the date(s) of your doses and the type of vaccine you received.




I missed my appointment for my booster shot, how do I schedule another one ASAP?


Contact the provider who administered your first shot and schedule your 2nd dose.




I missed my appointment for my booster shot, how soon do I need to get another shot so that it still takes full effect?


For Moderna – the Emergency Use Authorization provides information for efficacy when 2nd dose received at 28 days after the first dose. It can be administered up to 4 days earlier without any change in efficacy. There is no data on the efficacy if the second dose is administered after the 28 days.




Does it matter if my booster is a different brand than my first shot?


Yes. There have been no studies conducted on the efficacy of mixing brands of shots, therefore it is very important that you get the same brand for both shots to ensure you get the maximum coverage provided by the vaccination.





Vaccine Scheduling & Logistics

How will I be notified when it is my turn to get the vaccine?


Most primary care providers who have access to the COVID-19 vaccine are reaching out to their existing patient base to inform them of their eligibility to get vaccinated and schedule an appointment. Not all primary care providers in Missoula County will be able to give out the vaccine. Those folks will likely need to get vaccinated at public clinics hosted by the University of Montana and/or the Missoula City-County Health Department. To see which primary care providers are reaching out to patients to schedule appointements visit covid19.missoula.co.




How do I schedule a vaccine?


When appointments are open, links to schedule with MCCHD or the University of Montana can be found at covid19.missoula.co. Due to the limited vaccine supply, appointments tend to fill up within one hour of opening.




Do I have to get my first shot and booster at the same place?


While there is no rule for this, most vaccination clinics are scheduling second dose appointments during a patient’s first dose appointment. If, for some reason, you are unable to see the same provider for both shots, you should keep your COVID-19 vaccination card that proves you got your first COVID-19 shot and you need to make sure you get the same brand as your first COVID-19 shot.




How is prioritization decided while the vaccine is limited?


Missoula County is following the phases outlined by Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS). Due to limited supply, DPHHS gave counties the authority to create “tiers” within these phases. The Missoula City-County Board of Health adopted a tiered approach for phase 1b, that splits phase 1b into two tiers. These tiers were determined by epidemiological data. Tier 1 includes county residents ages 70 and older and Native Americans and other people of color ages 16 and older. Tier 2 will include county residents who are 16 to 69 with qualifying health conditions.




What if I forget which brand of vaccine I got for my first shot?


Each person who gets a COVID-19 vaccine should receive an immunization card which details which brand was given for the first shot.




Am I required to wait 15 minutes after receiving vaccine to be monitored for adverse reactions?


Yes. The 15-minute monitoring period is required if you receive a COVID-19 vaccine—this is for your protection.




Do you have an estimate of when Phase 1C will begin?


Due to the instability of the national vaccine supply, we have no estimate as to when Phase 1C will start.




What do I need to bring when I am scheduled for the vaccine?


Please bring your insurance card (if you have insurance), a valid ID, wear a mask, and wear clothing that provides easy access to your upper arm, where you will be given the COVID-19 vaccine shot.




Where are all the places I can go to receive the vaccine in Missoula County?


covid19.missoula.co has a list of the vaccine distributors in the County. While 26 providers signed up to give vaccine, not all 26 providers have vaccine on hand due to the shortage.




Can I travel out of the County to get the vaccine?


For those who do not live in Missoula County, but are offered a COVID-19 vaccine through their primary care provider located in Missoula County, they are welcome to get vaccinated through that provider. Because public health clinics are funded with tax-payer money, anyone who needs to get a vaccine through a public health provider should get vaccinated in the county they reside in.




Do I have to be a university student or employee to receive my vaccine at the Adam’s Center mass vaccination clinic?


No. This is a public clinic for Missoula County residents who meet the current phase/tier criteria.




What’s the time between the first and second shot for the vaccine?


For Pfizer it is 21 days, for Moderna it is 28 days.




I have health insurance, do I bring my card with me to get the vaccine? Is there a copay?


It is best that you bring your insurance card to the vaccination appointment. There is no copay passed on to the patient. Clinics may charge your insurance a small fee to cover the cost of the staff needed to administer the vaccine, but that cost will not be passed on to you. The vaccine itself is also free.




I’m uninsured—is there an out-of-pocket expense?


No. There is no cost for getting a COVID-19 vaccine regardless of a person’s health insurance status.





Approved Vaccines

Is one vaccine better than the other approved vaccine(s)?


All the COVID-19 vaccines available are comparable when it comes to preventing serious illness and death caused by COVID-19. There may appear to be dramatic differences in the efficacy reported for each vaccine. This is due to the fact that vaccines which were approved later were also tested against variants in their clinical trials, while vaccines which debuted earlier were not tested against variants in clinical trials. So, it is difficult to compare efficacy just by the percentage alone. Importantly, they are all proven effective and safe and residents should get whichever vaccine they can when it is their turn unless otherwise instructed by a medical professional.




What is the difference between a mRNA vaccine and a Ad26 vaccine?


Both Ad26 and mRNA vaccines teach our cells to create spike proteins to form an immune system response. Spike proteins give COVID-19 its characteristic ‘spiky’ shape and have been targeted throughout vaccine development. The Ad26 vaccine uses a modified adenovirus that includes the COVID-19 virus’s genetic instructions for building spike proteins. This genetic information travels to the nucleaus of the cell where it pushes its DNA and is read and copied into mRNA. The use of the adenovirus triggers an additional immune response. In contrast, the mRNA vaccines use messenger DNA (mRNA) to teach cells how to make spike proteins directly. The mRNA vaccine never enters the nuclear but teaches molecules within the cell to create spike proteins. Similar to Ad26 vaccines, these spike proteins trigger an immune response to COVID-19.




Will the different vaccines be distributed to certain clinics or demographics?


The vaccines are functionally similar in efficacy and safety. The Pfizer vaccine is the most logistically challenging due to the advanced freezer it requires. The Moderna vaccine requires a freezer available in most healthcare facilities. Thus, the Moderna vaccine is often sent to rural areas without major hospitals, smaller clinics, etc. The Pfizer vaccine is often sent to major universities and hospitals with advanced freezing capabilities. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccine also pose the additional logistical challenge of being a two-dose vaccine. Patients who come for one shot must come back either 3 weeks or 1 month—depending on which vaccine they received—after their first dose for a second shot.




Which vaccine is most effective against the variants?


All of the approved vaccines are satisfactorily effective against the major variants. Initial studies suggest the Pfizer vaccine is slightly more effective against certain variants, such as the South Africa variant. However, both vaccines produce such powerful levels of immune protection that they can withstand some drop in potency and still guard people from getting sick.




Will the approved vaccines be effective against variants?


Variants are a rapidly developing situation. While the vaccines may be slightly

less effective against some variants, vaccines still offer promising protection from

variants. Importantly, vaccines also protect recipients from severe illness and

death in the event that they do get sick.





Missoula City-County Health Department

301 W. Alder

Missoula, MT  59802

(406) 258-INFO - COVID-19 Information Line

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