Frequently Asked Questions

COVID Basics

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Basics


Coronaviruses are family of virus which include mild virus like the one that cause the Common Cold all the way to the virus which cause the SARS epidemic of 2002. COVID-19 is a new strain within this family of viruses that apperas to have started in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 enters the body through droplets spread by an infected person. These droplets appear to be most commonly breathed in, however it is still possible to get the virus through surfaces.




Key Terms


Active case: Cases in which someone has tested positive and has not yet tested negative. Close contact: If someone you have interacted with gets tested positive for the virus and you were within six feet of them for 15 minutes of more cumalitievely. For example, a server who tests positive for COVID-19 had served you before they knew they were positive. They took 5 minutes to take your order, 5 minutes to deliver your order, and 5 minutes to give you the check/say good-bye. Since that adds up to 15 minutes, you would then be a close contact and would need to contact Public Health for further instructions. Confirmed positive: Cases that have been twice tested to verify that the case is positive Contact tracing: When investigating close contacts, the Health Department is doing "contact tracing." This includes contacting any close contacts and instructing those individuals to quarantine and receive testing. Learn more about contact tracing by visiting the CDC website. COVID-19 Related Death: Coronavirus, like any virus, does not actually cause death, rather it is the response of the body that causes death. Rather, when your body fights a virus, it may cause organ failure, so if someone dies, the death is related to coronavirus. Learn more about COVID-19 fatalities through SciShow’s video Cumulative case: the total of cases in a given place (for example a county or state) Epi-linked: When a person cannot be tested for some reason, either they do not agree to be tested or they are too young to be tested, then that person is considered to be an “epi-linked” case. This means that, while they are not tracked as a positive case, they will still be required to be quarantined. False positive/negatives: If the confirmation test shows that the first test was wrong, then it is either a false positive or false negative, depending on the first diagnosis. False positives occur approximately this percentage and false negatives occur about this percentage. Isolation: separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick. Presumed/Presumptive Positive: When an individual receives the first test back, see the “How testing works” section for more information, OR when an individual is known to be a close contact of someone is a confirmed positive, then that person is a presumed positive. Recovered cases: Cases in which someone tested positive initially and now tests negative. Deaths are not counted as recovery. Quarantine: separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick. Sentinel testing: Also called "survelliance testing". This is when health officials make a plan to test a specific, asymptomtiac group in order to gain a better understanding of the spread of a virus. For example, a public health department might test asymptomtic first-responders while a hospital tests asymptomatic people age 50 and up. This would be part of a collective effort to understand the virus.




How is COVID-19 spread?


The COVID-19 virus is spread mainly from person-to-person between people who are in close contact with one another (within 6 feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Studies suggest that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing any symptoms. Maintaining good social distancing (6 feet or more) is very important in preventing the spread of COVID-19. It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own nose, mouth or eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. CDC recommends people practice frequent hand washing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. CDC also recommends routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces.




What are the symptoms of COVID-19?


Symptoms can be very mild to sever and can show 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19. Symptoms can include fever greater than 100.4, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, sore throat, chills or repeated shaking with chills, unexplained muscle pain, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, new loss of taste or smell, fatigue, congestion/runny nose and headache.




How can I prevent myself and others from getting COVID-19?


While there is no vaccine yet for the disease, you can decrease your risk of getting COVID-19 by following these preventive actions: - Avoid close contact with people outside of your household when possible. - Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. - Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces. - Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, scrubbing for at least 20 seconds. - If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. - Practice social distancing when possible. Remain at least 6 feet or more from others who are outside of your immediate household. - Wear a cloth face covering when in public places. A cloth face covering will not protect you from getting the virus but will protect others from getting the virus from you if you are contagious and have not yet developed symptoms. If you do get sick, you can help stop the spread of illness and protect your loved ones by doing the following: - Stay home if you are ill except to get medical care. Please call your health care provider before visiting them and let them know that you may have COVID-19. - Separate yourself as much as possible from other people in your home to prevent spreading to them. - Wear a face mask when going to seek medical care. The mask will minimize the spread of droplets through coughing or sneezing. - Do not share personal household items such as dishes, drinking glasses, towels, or bedding unless they are thoroughly washed. - Follow any additional guidance from the health department or a medical provider.




What cleaners and disinfectants effective against COVID-19?


Current information from the WHO and the CDC indicates that many standard household disinfectants are effective. The CDC recommends looking on disinfectants and seeing if they are effective against human coronavirus, SARS-like viruses, or CoV-2. It is believed that a 70% alcohol or a bleach solution of 1/3 cups per gallon of water or 4 tsp per quart of water will work. The bleach solution should be changed daily or made fresh before use.




What does social distancing mean?


Social distancing means remaining out of congregate settings (or busy public spaces), avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible.




What does physical distancing mean?


Physical distancing is the same as social distancing - it means remaining out of congregate settings (or busy public spaces), avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible. The World Health Organization recently recommended the use of the term "physical distancing" to help people understand that just because you need to keep space between yourself and others, that doesn't mean you need to cut off connections.




Should I avoid public spaces?


Governor Bullock’s Stay At Home directive that directed all individuals currently living within the State of Montana are directed to stay at home or at their place of residence to the greatest extent possible, except as allowed in the directive expired for individuals on April 26. If you are sick, please stay home and avoid public spaces. If you are well, you should assess your own risk and practice proper precautions including social distancing. If you are over 60 years of age or have underlying health conditions, you will be at elevated risk, and are encouraged to limit exposure.




Should I stay home from work, school, or restrict my everyday activities?


If you are sick, please stay home. If you are well, and not at high-risk for COVID-19, please practice social distancing, and other COVID precautions, and consider the risk to your health when making decisions. If you are well, and at high-risk for COVID-19, please take additional precautions. Employment: Work with your employer to see if there are ways to work remotely or if they can provide other accommodation. Everyday activities and events: Use your judgment and assess your risk. Use online platforms and methods when possible to conduct personal business. Practice social distancing, proper hand washing, and reconsider attending functions with large groups of people. Stay connected with your friends, family, and neighbors for assistance. Phase Two starte on June 1. If more than 50 people will be present in a group, activities must follow the requirements of Appendix A of the Health Officer’s May 28 order regarding COVID-19 Event Plans.




What are the key dates in the phased reopening of Missoula County?


April 26 -the Stay at Home Directive expires for individuals and places of worship April 27 – Non-essential retail businesses may reopen to curbside pickup or delivery only May 1 – Retail businesses, except those with later opening dates, may provide in-store business. These businesses must meet Missoula County requirements. Each business must create a plan for limiting the number of customers to 50%, providing social distancing measures, employee health screening, and excluding ill employees. Plan must include staff training. May 4 –Restaurants, bars, distilleries, breweries and casinos can provide service in the dining areas providing they abide by the Governor’s Directive. May 7 – Local school boards can decide to reopen. *Note – school boards in Missoula County chose to remain closed through the end of the school year. May 11 - Business and individuals providing grooming, beauty, body art, piercing, massage, spa and similar services, including but not limited to barbers (including barbers and barbers - nonchemical), cosmetologists, electrologists, estheticians may reopen providing they meet the minimum requirements in the Health Officer’s May 8 order. May 15 – Gyms, pools in gyms, movie theaters and non-interactive museums may reopen providing they follow the governor’s requirements. May 23 – Farmers markets may reopen providing they meet the minimum requirements in the Health Officers May 8 order. June 1 - All businesses and places of assembly may reopen, but group size is limited to 50 people without social distancing. Groups larger than 50 people must abide by the Health Officer's May 28 Order. October 27th - All businesses and places of assembly may reopen, but group size is limited to 25 people without social distancing. Groups larger than 25 people must abide by the Health Officer's October 27th Order.




How are vulnerable individuals protected with the Stay at Home Directive lifted?


All vulnerable individuals should continue to follow the stay at home guidance. In addition, members of households with vulnerable residents should be aware that by returning to work or other environments where distancing is not practical, they could carry the virus back home. Precautions should be taken to isolate from vulnerable residents.









Face Coverings

Why the Face Covering Mandate?


Missoula County and the State of Montana have issued face covering mandates. For some, the face covering mandates seem unnecessary, but evidence suggests that wearing masks may be one of the best and easiest ways to stop the spread of COVID-19. Visit "Stay Safe Outside of the Home" for more information about the Missoula County and State face covering mandates. Visit the CDC for more information on how and why cloth masks are effective against COVID-19.




Which face covering rule do we follow? The Governor's Directive, Local Rule or Health Officer Order?


There are several differences between state and local face covering requirements. Because all three rules are in effect in Missoula County, the most protective part of each rule applies when there are differences between them. In Missoula County, that means: - Everyone ages 5 and older is required to wear a face covering when inside public settings in Missoula County. - The face covering requirement applies both in the public facing side of a business and in the non-public areas of a business. Face coverings are required whenever the public is present. In areas or businesses where the public is not allowed, face coverings are required, except when people can maintain 6 feet or more from other people. - There is no exception for persons giving a speech or engaging in an artistic, cultural, musical, or theatrical performance for an audience. Face coverings must be worn when the public is present.




What is an acceptable face covering?


Face coverings must be a cloth, paper, or disposable face covering that completely covers one’s nose and mouth, fits snugly against the sides of one’s face, and is made of two or more layers. • Neck gaiters used as face coverings should be folded over to add an additional protective layer. • Unacceptable face coverings include hairnets, mesh, lace, standard face shields, and any face covering including an exhalation valve. • Standard plastic face shields cannot be used as a replacement for a cloth face covering or mask or as a standalone accommodation for an employee or customer who cannot wear a facecovering. Standard face shields are not effective at controlling the spread of respiratory droplets: they direct respiratory droplets down and around the plastic visor. Certain types of enhanced face shields have an additional fabric barrier around and underneath the plastic shield, providing more respiratory droplet control. An enhanced face shield with this additional fabric cowl/barrier attached to the shield is an acceptable face covering in Missoula County, and is also an adequate standalone accommodation for someone who cannot wear a mask.




How long will we have to wear face coverings?


• The face covering requirements will be in effect in Missoula County until the Health Board and Health Officer amend the local rules, even if there are fewer than 4 active cases. • The Board of Health and Health Officer reevaluate the local rule regularly in light of current epidemiological data and trends. The Board of Health meets monthly and routinely communicates with the Health Officer and Incident Commander throughout the month, as needed.




Why the Face Covering Mandate?


Missoula County and the State of Montana have issued face covering mandates. For some, the face covering mandates seem unnecessary, but evidence suggests that wearing masks may be one of the best and easiest ways to stop the spread of COVID-19. Visit "Stay Safe Outside of the Home" for more information about the Missoula County and State face covering mandates. Visit the CDC for more information on how and why cloth masks are effective against COVID-19.




Which face covering rule do we follow? The Governor's Directive, Local Rule or Health Officer Order?


There are several differences between state and local face covering requirements. Because all three rules are in effect in Missoula County, the most protective part of each rule applies when there are differences between them. In Missoula County, that means: - Everyone ages 5 and older is required to wear a face covering when inside public settings in Missoula County. - The face covering requirement applies both in the public facing side of a business and in the non-public areas of a business. Face coverings are required whenever the public is present. In areas or businesses where the public is not allowed, face coverings are required, except when people can maintain 6 feet or more from other people. - There is no exception for persons giving a speech or engaging in an artistic, cultural, musical, or theatrical performance for an audience. Face coverings must be worn when the public is present.




What is an acceptable face covering?


Face coverings must be a cloth, paper, or disposable face covering that completely covers one’s nose and mouth, fits snugly against the sides of one’s face, and is made of two or more layers. • Neck gaiters used as face coverings should be folded over to add an additional protective layer. • Unacceptable face coverings include hairnets, mesh, lace, standard face shields, and any face covering including an exhalation valve. • Standard plastic face shields cannot be used as a replacement for a cloth face covering or mask or as a standalone accommodation for an employee or customer who cannot wear a facecovering. Standard face shields are not effective at controlling the spread of respiratory droplets: they direct respiratory droplets down and around the plastic visor. Certain types of enhanced face shields have an additional fabric barrier around and underneath the plastic shield, providing more respiratory droplet control. An enhanced face shield with this additional fabric cowl/barrier attached to the shield is an acceptable face covering in Missoula County, and is also an adequate standalone accommodation for someone who cannot wear a mask.




How long will we have to wear face coverings?


• The face covering requirements will be in effect in Missoula County until the Health Board and Health Officer amend the local rules, even if there are fewer than 4 active cases. • The Board of Health and Health Officer reevaluate the local rule regularly in light of current epidemiological data and trends. The Board of Health meets monthly and routinely communicates with the Health Officer and Incident Commander throughout the month, as needed.




Is other Phase 2 COVID-19 Guidance still in effect?


Yes. The face covering requirements are in addition to the other rules in effect for Phase 2 reopening, including the Governor’s Directive for Phase 2 and the Health Officer’s Order. For example, restaurants still have to limit capacity to 75%, patrons have to be seated at tables at least 6 feet from customers at other tables, bars still have to close at 12:30 am, and events with more than 50 people have to be highly structured and meet the requirements in Appendix A of the Health Order.




Do Missoula hospitals want homemade (home sewn) masks?


At this time healthcare organizations are not using homemade masks in the medical setting. Homemade masks have not gone through the same safety tests as masks worn by first responders and medical providers. The fabric available in the community has not undergone testing, so there is no way to know which fabrics, if any, will provide actual protection. The primary medical role of masks is to reduce the chance that people who are ill can spread a virus by breathing or coughing on others. People should not expect homemade masks to serve as adequate protection against getting a virus. Handwashing and social distancing is still the best way to protect yourself from the COVID-19 virus.




I made home sewn masks. Where can I take them?


United Way of Missoula County will collect mask donations and distribute masks upon request. A collection bin is on their front porch at 412 West Alder in downtown Missoula. All masks must be washable. United Way is not able to accept donations of other goods. For information on how to make face masks, national retailer JOANN Fabrics and Craft Stores has released a video tutorial.




Where can I acquire home sewn masks?


If you are in need of homemade masks, email volunteermissoula@gmail.com. Please do not call, as their staffing is limited at this time.




How many face coverings does an employer have to provide?


This falls within the scope and authority of employers. Neither the Health Board rule nor the Governor’s Directive give a specific number, leaving it to individual business to interpret and implement. The key is to make sure that employees have sufficient face coverings (regardless of who provides them) and that laundering practices are in place so that staff can wear a clean face covering to work each day.




What if my employee cannot wear a face covering because of a medical or mental health issue?


Employers must work with employees who cannot wear face coverings to identify a safe, alternative, reasonable accommodation for your specific work setting. Options include but are not limited to things like remote work, wearing of a face shield instead of a mask, or moving/modifying the workspace to ensure that the unmasked employee is not in an area accessible to the public, and is able to maintain 6 feet between coworkers.




What if my employee refuses to wear a face covering?


If your employee can, but does not want to wear a face covering, then, as a business, government entity, or person in charge of an indoor space, you must require that they wear one. We are not in the position to give legal advice on human resource law. We suggest that you think about what you would do if you had an employee refusing to follow a different workplace requirement or policy specific to your work setting.




What if a customer does not want to wear a face covering?


If someone refuses to wear a face covering and they do not meet an exemption in the order, the business needs to ask them to wear one, or ask them to leave and access services through alternative methods. Businesses and customers can explore, develop, and implement alternative options for those that will not wear face coverings. Options include but are not limited to things like curbside pickup and delivery services, and online/remote options.




What if a customer cannot wear face covering because of personal, medical health conditions?


Those who are unable to wear a face covering are not required to disclose their personal, private, medical information to a business. Businesses should take a customer’s statement at face value, and then work with them to find an alternative solution so that other customers and employees are protected. In many cases, the business will be able to provide goods or services without the customer entering the building, through curbside pickup and delivery services, online/remote options, outside seating, or similar reasonable accommodations. For other businesses that require entry into a building or public space for a service, the business should work with the individual to figure out how to provide the goods or service, while continuing to provide protection to employees and other people in the indoor space. Businesses can refer to the Disability Issues Brief on Face Mask Policies from the Southeast Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center for more information.




How far do we have to go to enforce the Face Covering Requirements with customers?


Wearing a face covering is not optional. As a manger or owner of an indoor space that is open to the public, you are obligated to ensure that staff and customers are wearing face coverings. In addition to posting appropriate, accessible, and highly visible signs that notify people before entering, you must have a plan in place to approach patrons or guests that do not have their face covered. Ideally, this happens as the person enters the establishment. If, after speaking with the person:
• You determine that the person isn’t following the face covering requirement because they claim to have a health condition that makes wearing a face covering unsafe or dangerous, you can proceed to offering them a safe alternate accommodation (described above).
• You determine that the person is refusing to wear a face covering but is not claiming a health condition that would justify an exemption, they are not allowed to enter, or remain in, your space. Follow whatever protocols you have in place for patrons/guests that refuse to follow other rules (i.e. not wearing shirts/shoes, wearing backpacks in areas where they are not allowed, filming or using flash photos in areas where it is not allowed, etc.).
We know that requiring face coverings is not always an easy task. To meet the goal of widespread use of face coverings, businesses need to:
o Have clear expectations in place, including signage,
o Have a way to accommodate those who cannot wear a face covering,
o Have a plan in place that clearly describes how your business will effectively exclude those who refuse to wear a face covering for non-health-related reasons,
o Ensure employees wear face coverings and set the expectation/standard, and
o Make it easy/comfortable for customers to wear face coverings inside.




How will this rule be enforced?


The Health Department responds to complaints by talking with the business and helping them identify necessary changes to comply with both the Governor’s Directives and local health requirements. If a business will not come into compliance, the Department can take additional steps, including but not limited to a written violation notice, a Health Officer order to comply or to close, or pursuing compliance through the court system. It is primarily up to the business or manager of the indoor public place to ensure that their employees, customers, and volunteers comply with wearing face coverings as required by the rule.




If I put up a sign that says mask are required unless they have a medical condition, can I/we just assume anyone without one has a qualifying condition?


If I put up a sign that says mask are required unless they have a medical condition, can I/we just assume anyone without one has a qualifying condition?




Can I use my own sign, or do I have to use the one on the Health Department website?


You can make your own sign, but whatever sign you use has to include this language from the order in large enough font for customers to be able to see it easily when entering the building: “Mask or face covering use required for ages 5 or older.”




How many signs do I have to put up?


Post as many as needed to ensure compliance with the order within your indoor settings. A sign at each entry must contain the statement “Mask or Face Covering Use Required for Ages 5 and older” but businesses can put up other signs as needed.




Do the new face covering rules apply to childcare facilities?


Yes, but children younger than 5 years old do not have to wear them, and children under 2 should never wear them. There are also exceptions for when children and adults are engaged in strenuous exercise or are in other conditions that make wearing a face covering unsafe or impractical. Parents/guardians who are picking up/dropping children off must wear a face covering if and when entering and/or exiting a childcare facility.




Does this rule apply to places of worship?


Yes. The order does not exempt places of worship.




Is there a religious exemption?


No. The only exemptions are for medical conditions or inability to wear them due to age or ability.




My office is not open to the public, do we have to wear masks?


If there is no opportunity for non-employees to enter (even by appointment), then masks are only required for employees in situations where 6 feet of physical separation is not always easily maintained, like in break rooms, entryways, shared vehicles, hallways, and shared restrooms.




What qualifies as “strenuous” exercise?


What qualifies as “strenuous” will be different for everyone because everyone has different fitness and or tolerance levels when it comes to physical activity. Exercisers should take their mask off at the point that the mask makes it hard to breathe.




Is there a list of places where businesses can buy masks?


Not that we currently know of. We don’t have a list, but we have found that it is relatively easy to find masks, both cloth and disposable. They are in stock at a number of businesses downtown and online. CDC has an online tutorial that shows how to make a cloth face covering that doesn’t require sewing skills.





At-Risk Populations

Who is most susceptible to COVID-19?


COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:
-People aged 65 years and older -People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility -People of all ages with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness, particularly if the underlying medical conditions are not well controlled. This includes people with: Chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma Heart disease with complications Conditions that can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications. Severe obesity (body mass index [(BM]I)≥40) Diabetes Chronic kidney disease and who are undergoing dialysis Liver disease People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications




Are pregnant women at increased risk?


We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public, nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses. Visit the CDC’s page for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding for more information.




Can COVID-19 cause problems during pregnancy?


We do not know at this time if COVID-19 would cause problems during pregnancy or affect the health of the baby after birth.




What is the risk for people with asthma?


People with asthma may be at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. COVID-19 can affect your respiratory tract (nose, throat, lungs), cause an asthma attack, and possibly lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory disease.
For more information and recommendations for persons with asthma, please visit the CDC’s page for people with asthma.




What is the risk for people with HIV?


The risk of serious illness from COVID-19 for people with HIV is currently unknown. The CDC will be updating their page for persons with HIV as information becomes available. Please visit the CDC’s page for persons with HIV for advice and answers to some frequent questions.





Businesses

What businesses and public spaces are open?


Public lands - While public lands are still open for most day use and hiking, federal and state agencies may have restrictions to prohibit camping and facility use. Please be sure to check with the agency overseeing the recreational area you want to visit for specific restrictions. As of the Phase Two reopening (June 1), all businesses and places of assembly may open.




What if businesses aren't following the orders?


If you have a complaint regarding compliance with the governor's directive or health officer's order, please email envhealth@missoulacounty.us or call 406-258-4755. If someone doesn’t answer your call to take the complaint, leave a message, and someone will respond to the complaint even if you do not get a return call. Please do not call 9-1-1 to report non-compliance.




Why aren't all non-essential businesses closed?


Our department is looking at what additional measures need to be taken, including closures. All open businesses are required by Health Officer Ellen Leahy and Governor Bullock to change the way that they do business to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect our community. There are many things that we need to consider when issuing orders, including downstream effects, and when we can safely rescind an order. Closures can disrupt essential services by pulling people out of the workforce, stalling transportation, creating issues with childcare, among others. These orders are issued after a great deal of thought and consideration about the right balance of disruption to possible benefit. That said, employees and community members can take measures to protect themselves without the health department ordering places to close. People can practice social distancing and keep 6 feet between themselves and coworkers or customers. People can push online services as much as possible, use drive-through services, conference calls, and other tools to decrease interactions. People can increase the disinfection of surfaces and implement strong sick policies to keep ill employees home.




What can I do to protect my employees in the workplace?


The CDC has a great guide on their website, which we have linked on our main page http://missoula.co/cvirus to help you think about workplace preparedness. We encourage you to do the following: Review your employee illness policy to ensure that employees can stay home when sick to take care of themselves and prevent spreading illness to coworkers, customers, and clients. Ask employees to stay home if they have coughing, fever, or shortness of breath. If your policy requires a note from a medical professional, we encourage you to temporarily suspend the practice. Ensure that employees have a way to wash hands with soap and water at the workplace. Encourage employees to wash their hands frequently throughout the day. Increase cleaning and disinfection of shared areas and commonly touched surfaces, including customer areas. Many standard household disinfectants will work. Check to see if they are effective against human coronavirus, CoV-2 or Sars-like viruses. There is also a list of EPA registered disinfectants that will work on this page. Think about essential staffing needed to continue operations in case you do have employees who call in sick. Think about how you can continue to serve customers and clients using online methods. Reconsider all non-essential travel. Provide employees, especially those who are high-risk, ways to telecommute or provide other reasonable accommodation.




What are the requirements and recommendations for businesses and farmer's markets under Phase One?


Effective Monday, April 27, employers should: -Continue to encourage telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations. -Close common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact, or enforce strict social distancing protocols. -Minimize non-essential business travel. -Make special accommodations for members of a vulnerable population or those with vulnerable household members. Business requirements and guidance from the governor and local health: -Health assessments must be conducted for all employees at the beginning of each shift, AND -In establishments where customers wait in a line, non-household customers should remain physically distanced, AND -Physical distancing of 6 feet must be maintained between non-congregate customers, AND -Waiting areas where adequate physical distancing cannot be maintained must be closed, AND -At any given time, maximum number of customers shall be 50% of usual business capacity, AND -Measures are in place to protect customers and staff waiting in line at checkout counters, such as visible markers or signs denoting six-foot separation or temporary barriers, AND Staff have received training on practicing good hygiene, maintaining physical distancing, recognizing the symptoms of COVID-19, and not reporting to work if experiencing symptoms; AND -The business has developed and implemented an individualized plan addressing the requirements in the Governor’s re-opening directive and the Health Officer’s Order. The completed plan must be maintained on site and be made available to the Health Department upon request, AND -Customers should be encouraged to call for a reservation or an appointment, or establishments should use an online wait listing application. Governor Bullock’s requirements for restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries and casinos: Dining areas in food and drink establishments such as restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries and casinos shall remain closed if the requirements and guidelines in the Governor’s directive cannot be met: -All seated groups of customers in food and drink establishments must be at least 6 feet from other customers, including those sitting in booths. AND -A specific cleaning plan must be implemented, and employees must be trained in proper sanitation practices. Materials will be available on the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) food and consumer services website. AND -All surfaces occupied must be cleaned between customers, including tables, chairs, booths, and highchairs. AND -Table items including, condiments, menus, napkins, and décor, should be removed from the table unless they can be adequately cleaned between customers. AND -Menus must be cleaned between customers. AND -Growlers and refillable or reusable containers must be cleaned prior to being refilled. AND -Gaming machines must be adequately cleaned between customers. AND -All patrons must be out of bars, restaurants and casinos by 11:30 p.m. (Breweries and distilleries shall follow existing laws on closing time.). Governor Bullock’s requirements and guidance for gyms: -Only registered members can use the facility, no day passes or walk-in. -Facility must have a dedicated staff available during operating hours to wipe down frequently touched areas on a regular basis and monitor gyms zones to ensure that users are wiping down equipment properly. -Train workers on symptom awareness and proper handwashing technique. -Signage must be posted with the following or substantially similar wording: -Hand sanitizer must be made available at front desk and at stations throughout the workout area. -Approved sanitizer for cleaning equipment after use must be provided at stations throughout the workout areas along with disposable towels. Reusable towels shall not be used to clean equipment. -Post signs throughout workout area reminding patrons to wipe equipment after each use. -Six-foot distance should be maintained between equipment. Cardio studios should limit guests to every other piece of equipment to achieve this. -Guest using free weights shall maintain six feet of separation except when a spotter is necessary. In this instance, workout groups shall be limited to two people. -Sitting areas must be closed for use. -Food vendors must follow applicable COVID-19 procedures for restaurants and retail food service. Vendors should be encouraged to use single-service items whenever possible, especially for condiments and similar foods. -Social distancing must be maintained in dressing rooms and other common areas. No congregating in these areas may be allowed. -After closing, establishments must clean using an EPA approved disinfectant. Twenty-four-hour establishments must close from 11:30 pm to 12am so that proper disinfection can happen. -Frequently touched surfaces must be cleaned and sanitized regularly throughout the day and disinfected each night after closing. -Personal training sessions may be offered with strict adherence to social distancing guidelines and masks are encouraged to be used by the trainer and trainee. -Indoor group classes may not be offered. -Alternatively, group classes may be offered outdoors with strict adherence to social distancing guidelines and should avoid gathering in groups of more than 10 people in circumstances that do not readily allow for appropriate physical distancing. -Additional time between group classes outdoors must be provided so that a designated gym employee can disinfect any equipment and other cleanable surfaces before the next class begins. Governor Bullock’s requirements and guidance for pools at gyms: -Only registered members can use the facility, no day passes or walk-ins -Train workers on symptom awareness and proper handwashing procedures Pool classes may continue; if: -Youth swim lessons may be offered in-line with previous guidance for Phase 1, which includes youth activities should avoid gathering in groups of more than 10 people in circumstances that do not readily allow for appropriate physical distancing. -Front desk/gate attendant tracks occupancy, incoming and outgoing to ensure maximum occupancy does not exceed 50% capacity of normal bather load; -Signage must be posted with the following or substantially similar wording. “Members with fever, shortness of breath, a cough, or other COVID-19 symptoms must refrain from using this facility.” -Signs shall be positioned for effective visual observation by members, such as on the entry way door -No congregating in waiting areas, patrons should wait in an appropriately spaced line or way that observes social distancing -Signage must be posted on the locker room door with the following or substantially similar wording, “Observe social distancing while using this facility. No loitering in common areas.” -Social distancing should be applied in all common areas -6-foot spacing between unassociated members (i.e. not family members) in the pool. -6-foot spacing between groups of no more than 10 (i.e. family groups and unrelated individuals must maintain 6-foot separation) in the pool. -Space pool deck tables and chairs to facilitate a 6-foot distance. Governor Bullock’s requirements and guidance for movie theaters and museums: -Maximum number of attendees is 50 percent of normal capacity while maintaining 6 feet between non-family member groups. -Signage must be posted with the following or substantially similar wording: -Increase cleaning and sanitizing of frequently touched surfaces, including door handles, chairs and tables. -Keep social distancing of at least 6 feet between non-family member groups or immediate party. -Food vendors must follow applicable COVID-19 procedures for restaurants and retail food service. Vendors should be encouraged to use single-service items whenever possible, especially for condiments and similar foods. -Provide hand sanitizer or hand washing stations throughout the venue whenever possible. -Increase cleaning and sanitizing of restrooms to no less than every two hours whenever possible. -Provide clear plastic shielding between workers and attendees whenever possible, such as event cashiers and food vendors. -If possible do not use tables. Tables should be covered with single-use material and discarded between users, showings, performances or every two hours, whichever provides maximum spread protection. -Train workers on COVID-19 symptom awareness and proper handwashing procedures. -Increase cleaning time period between events, performances and showings. Ensure that commonly touched surfaces such as arm rests and railings are cleaned frequently. -Ushers should monitor and enforce social distancing practices in theaters and encourage additional distance between guests as appropriate. -Gift shops should limit entry to 50% capacity and clean commonly touched surfaces frequently. State and local requirements for personal care services: -Before reopening, personal care businesses must a complete a Personal Care Service Plan for their business that shows how they will meet the minimum requirements and have it available upon request by the Missoula City-County Health Department. The plan must cover: -Before they begin serving clients again, employees must be provided and sign the “Employee Health Agreement for COVID-19” in Appendix C of the Health Officers May 8 order. -Employees must be screened for symptoms of COVID-19 pre-shift and clients must be screened before they are served. -Employees must wear cloth face coverings or masks when providing services. -Clients must wear cloth face coverings or masks, except when receiving services that make a face covering or mask impossible. -Waiting area must be limited to 50% capacity with six-foot distancing between clients. -Employees must wash hands between each client. -Employees providing services where their forearms may touch the client, may not wear sleeves that extend past the elbow, and handwashing between clients must include up to the elbow. -Workstations, client chairs, tools and instruments used for personal care services must be disinfected between clients. -An enhanced cleaning plan for the entire facility must be devised and implemented. -Stylist stations and client chairs must be arranged in a manner that provides at least 6’ of physical distance between other people in the establishment. The minimum distance of 6’ is between people, not seats or stations. The placement of stations and chairs must accommodate movement of employees and clients through the establishment in a way that maintains at least 6’ separation. Specific requirements for farmers markets: -Before the first event, organizers must a complete a Farmers’ Market Operation Plan that shows how they will meet the minimum requirements and submit it to the Missoula City-County Health Department for approval. The plan must be submitted at least 8 working days before the first event to envhealth@missoulacounty.us or 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. The Department will provide responses to completed plans withing one week of receiving the plan. Responses may include event-specific requirements or requests for more information. A market shall not operate without written approval of their Operating Plan from the Missoula City-County Health Department. -The market is limited to the sale of unprocessed agricultural products and may not include entertainment or activities. -The market must put adequate provisions in place to ensure vendors and customers can maintain 6-foot physical distancing. At a minimum, that must include the following: -The market must put adequate provisions in place to ensure personal hygiene, sanitation and personal protection. At a minimum, that must include the following: -The market must put adequate provisions in place to ensure enhanced cleaning and sanitizing. At a minimum, that must include frequent cleaning and sanitization of any frequently touched surfaces, including public restrooms used by vendors, staff, volunteers and customers.




What social distancing measures are required by retail businesses and food and drink establishments in Missoula County?


In establishments where customers wait in a line, non-household customers should remain physically distanced, AND Physical distancing of 6 feet must be maintained between non-congregate customers, AND Waiting areas where adequate physical distancing cannot be maintained must be closed, AND At any given time, maximum number of customers shall be 50% of usual business capacity, AND Measures are in place to protect customers and staff waiting in line at checkout counters, such as visible markers or signs denoting six-foot separation or temporary barriers, AND All seated groups of customers in food and drink establishments must be at least 6 feet from other customers, including those sitting in booths. AND The business has developed and implemented an individualized plan addressing the requirements in the Governor’s re-opening directive and the Health Officer’s Order. The completed plan must be maintained on site and be made available to the Health Department upon request, AND Customers should be encouraged to call for a reservation or an appointment, or establishments should use an online wait listing application.




How can customers support businesses while protecting themselves and others?


Customers have a responsibility to protect employees and other patrons. Respect and abide by the social distancing measures put in place by the business you are visiting. Wear a cloth face covering, wash your hands often, know the symptoms of COVID-19 and do not enter businesses if you are symptomatic. Please understand that the changes businesses are implementing are there to keep everyone as healthy as possible so we can continue operating in the new normal and move forward with reopening. Some businesses may require you to use a cloth face covering. This may feel inconvenient, but it is an important measure to keep employees safe. While you may spend minutes inside and see few people, employees are there all day and are exposed to many people throughout their shift. When you wear a cloth face covering and abide by physical distance markers, you are helping keep those employees healthy and safe. Also, some businesses may require you to wait for service or available tables in your vehicle. This, again, is to protect you and their employees. Take advantage of take-out, online ordering, curbside delivery and other options that limit the time you spend in close quarters with non-household members.




What are the requirements and recommendations for businesses under Phase Two?


Effective Monday, June 1, employers should: Continue to encourage telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations. Close common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact or enforce strict social distancing protocols. Minimize non-essential business travel. Make special accommodations for members of a vulnerable population or those with vulnerable household members.





Travel and Recreation

I traveled to another state, do I need to get tested or call the health department?


Not at this time. You do not need to get tested for the virus based on travel alone. Travelers arriving in Missoula County may contact the Missoula City-County Health Department at 258-INFO with questions. Travelers who develop symptoms of COVID-19 should contact a health care provider.

Historical Note: On March 30, 2020, the Governor of Montana issued a directive mandating a 14-day travel quarantine for travelers arriving in Montana. This mandate expired on June 1st, 2020 as part of the Phase II opening




Do people staying at a vacation rental need to self-quarantine?


Not at this time.

The governor's travel quarantine expired on June 1st, 2020 as part of the Phase II reopening.

The Montana National Guard remains authorized to conduct temperature checks, assess individuals for COVID-19 symptoms, and to inquire about exposure history of any traveler arriving in Montana from another state or country through air or rail travel, consistent with the terms and restrictions provided in the March 30 Directive




What does self-quarantine mean for travelers?


If you are self-quarantining, you cannot leave for groceries, public outdoor recreation, to go to work or any other activity. You must remain at your place of quarantine for the duration of the quarantine period. Exceptions will only be made in the event of a medical emergency, fire, natural disaster or other act of God preventing the ongoing healthful habitation of a residence. Note that the governor's travel quarantine expired on June 1st, 2020 as part of the Phase II reopening.




My boss wants me to get tested due to recent travel in the US, is this recommended by the health department?


No. The test is not designed to screen exposure but to diagnose illness.




Can I still recreate on public lands? What’s currently closed?


While public lands are still open for most day use and hiking, federal and state agencies may have restrictions to prohibit camping and facility use. Please be sure to check with the agency overseeing the recreational area you want to visit for specific restrictions.




Should I suspend my travel plans?


You should check the CDC’s travel recommendations, keeping in mind that COVID-19 is a rapidly changing situation and that advisories may change during your trip to include your destination or layover locations. When making travel decisions, you not only need to think about the risk of getting COVID-19, but also how your return travel and daily activities may be affected once you get home. If you are in the high-risk group of those over 60 years of age or those with underlying medical conditions, please reconsider all non-essential travel.




How is outdoor recreation affected in Phase Two?


Per the Governor’s May 19 Directive, groups are limited to no more than 50 people without social distancing. This may impact some outdoor group recreation. For groups larger than 50 people, Missoula County residents must adhere to the social distancing requirements in the Health Officer’s May 28 order. Per the state’s guidance, public lands, fishing access sites, and parks are encouraged to continue to provide outdoor recreation opportunities for local and regional users if users can adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and facilities follow frequent sanitizing protocols. Areas that cannot practicably implement social distancing requirements or sanitation needs will remain closed. Limited campground offerings, group-use facilities and playgrounds may be opened at the discretion of local and state managers. Local, state and federal officials are strongly encouraged to coordinate on all reopening decisions. Guides and outfitters may offer services consistent with any ongoing quarantine travel restrictions provided they adhere to social distancing guidelines and sanitation protocols. Visitors should check the status of any closures and restrictions before traveling.









Phase 2 Guidance

Is other Phase 2 COVID-19 Guidance still in effect?


Yes. The face covering requirements are in addition to the other rules in effect for Phase 2 reopening, including the Governor’s Directive for Phase 2 and the Health Officer’s Order. As of October 29th, 2020 restaurants in Missoula County have to limit capacity to 50%, patrons have to be seated at tables at least 6 feet from customers at other tables and cannot be in groups larger than 8 people, bars have to close at 10:00 pm, and events with more than 25 people have to be highly structured and meet the requirements in Appendix A of the Health Order issued October 27th.




Do travelers coming into Montana need to self-quarantine?


Not at this time.

The governor's travel quarantine expired on June 1st, 2020 as part of the Phase II reopening.

The Montana National Guard remains authorized to conduct temperature checks, assess individuals for COVID-19 symptoms, and to inquire about exposure history of any traveler arriving in Montana from another state or country through air or rail travel, consistent with the terms and restrictions provided in the March 30 Directive.




What does the governor's directive and health officer's order say about social distancing?


Under Phase One, if you cannot maintain at least six feet of space between individuals, group size is limited to 10 people. You should strive to maintain at least six feet of distance between individuals regardless of group size. Also per the Health Officer’s order events and gatherings such as, but not limited to, fairs, festivals, craft fairs, vendor events, concerts, sporting events and races shall be limited to 50 people during Phase One and six-foot physical distance between participants shall be maintained. Under Phase Two, effective June 1, 2020, if you cannot maintain at least six feet of space between individuals, group size is limited to 50 people. You should strive to maintain at least six feet of distance between individuals regardless of group size. If you are planning an event with more than 50 people, you must adhere to requirements of the Health Officer’s May 28 Order and Appendix A regarding event planning.




What if people aren't following the directive or Health Officer Ellen Leahy's order?


If you have a complaint regarding compliance with the the governor's directive or health officer's order, please email envhealth@missoulacounty.us or call 406-258-4755. Please do not call 9-1-1 to report non-compliance.




Are social, civic, or faith-based gatherings restricted?


In Phase Two (starting June 1) all social, civic and faith-based gatherings may become operational. If you cannot maintain at least six feet of space between individuals, group size is limited to 50 people under Phase Two. You should strive to maintain at least six feet of distance between individuals regardless of group size. Per the Health Officer’s May 28 order, if more than 50 people will be present at events and gatherings such as, but not limited to, fairs, festivals, craft fairs, vendor events, concerts, sporting events, and races, organizers must follow the requirements of Appendix A of the Health Officer’s May 28 order regarding COVID-19 Event Plans. This does not apply to worship services, but it does apply to faith-based, social and civic events and gatherings (such as community dinners).




What goes into a decision to close a school? Why aren't schools closed?


Governor Bullock closed schools on March 15 and turned the decision over to local school board on April 22. In the weeks following April 22, every public school board in Missoula County made the decision to keep schools closed and continue distance learning through the end of the school year. School Boards across the county have made decisions about how school will be conducted in their districts for the 2020-2021 school year.




What do I still need to do, now that the Governor lifted the Stay at Home Directive?


Stay home as much as possible and practice social distancing when you leave home. The virus is still in our community, and we continue to see cases caused by community spread. Lifting the directive is an economic decision, not a public health decision. Without a government mandate, it is now up to personal decision-making and behavior changes to control the spread of the virus. If you are sick, please stay home and avoid public spaces. If you are well, you should assess your own risk and practice proper precautions including social distancing. If you are over 60 years of age or have underlying health conditions, you will be at elevated risk, and are encouraged to limit exposure. Use your judgment and assess your risk. Use online platforms and methods when possible to conduct personal business. Practice social distancing, proper hand washing, and reconsider attending functions with large groups of people. Stay connected with your friends, family, and neighbors for assistance. Maintain at least six feet between yourself and other people when outside your home. Wear a cloth face covering when out in public to limit the risk of presymptomatic spread.




Can I go outside?


Yes. Engaging in outdoor activity is good for your physical and mental health. Make sure you’re complying with social distancing and ensure a distance of six feet from others not in their household, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, running, or biking. You may go to public parks and open outdoor recreation areas, including public lands in Montana provided they remain open to recreation. Follow instructions on signage at public use areas. You are discouraged from outdoor recreation activities that pose enhanced risks of injury or could otherwise stress the ability of local first responders to address the COVID-19 emergency (e.g., backcountry skiing in a manner inconsistent with avalanche recommendations or in closed terrain).




Why does the local orders say about group size for Phase Two?


The governor’s directive for Phase Two states that individuals planning an event with more than 50 people should consult with their local public health office on a plan to implement adequate social distancing. The Health Officer’s May 28 order addresses this requirement by providing guidance and setting minimum social distancing requirements for larger groups.





Exposure to COVID-19

What if I was exposed to someone who has developed symptoms of COVID-19?


The person who has developed symptoms should seek a COVID-19 test. If the individual tests positive, the health department will reach out to the patient’s close contacts. The Health Department investigates the travel history and exposure risk of all known COVID-19 cases to identify and communicate with anyone who may have been a close contact with the patient. A close contact is someone who was within six feet of the patient for a prolonged period (at least 15 minutes) or was directly exposed to the patient’s infectious secretions (such as respiratory droplets). People who are concerned that they may have been exposed to a positive case but have not been contacted by the health department or developed symptoms do not need to be tested. If you are identified as a close contact and the health department contacts you, you will be given instructions to follow based upon your level of exposure.




What should I do if I was exposed to someone who is awaiting test results?


Individuals awaiting test results should be in isolation. If an individual’s COVID-19 test result comes back positive, the health department will reach out to the patient’s close contacts. The Health Department investigates the travel history and exposure risk of all known COVID-19 cases to identify and communicate with anyone who may have been a close contact with the patient. A close contact is someone who was within six feet of the patient for a prolonged period (at least 15 minutes) or was directly exposed to the patient’s infectious secretions (such as respiratory droplets). People who are concerned that they may have been exposed to a positive case but have not been contacted by the health department or developed symptoms do not need to be tested. If you are identified as a close contact and the health department contacts you, you will be given instructions to follow based upon your level of exposure.




What should I do if I was exposed to someone who tested positive?


The Health Department investigates the travel history and exposure risk of all known COVID-19 cases to identify and communicate with anyone who may have been a close contact with the patient. A close contact is someone who was within six feet of the patient for a prolonged period (at least 15 minutes) or was directly exposed to the patient’s infectious secretions (such as respiratory droplets). People who are concerned that they may have been exposed to a positive case but have not been contacted by the health department or developed symptoms do not need to be tested. If you are identified as a close contact and the health department contacts you, you will be given instructions to follow based upon your level of exposure.




What is a close contact?


Per the CDC, a close contact is someone who was within six feet of the patient for a prolonged period (at least 15 minutes. The 15 minutes may be cumulative.) or was directly exposed to the patient’s infectious secretions (such as respiratory droplets). People who are concerned that they may have been exposed to a positive case but have not been contacted by the health department or developed symptoms do not need to be tested. If you are identified as a close contact and the health department contacts you, you will be given instructions to follow based upon your level of exposure.




When can someone, who tested positive for COVID-19, return to work?


If someone tests positive for COVID-19, a public health nurse will let them know when they can return to work. If someone has symptoms but doesn’t test positive, they can return when symptoms resolve; however, if a medical professional says to stay home for longer, follow their instructions. We encourage people to remember that this is evolving and that guidance may change as more information becomes available.




What are the risks of food from takeout or drive-thru?


There is no current indication that takeout or drive-thru meals will increase illness This option is a good risk management choice, especially for high risk and elderly groups because it helps maintain social distancing and reduces the number of touch points.




What are the risks of food delivered to home?


Similar to takeout, food delivery helps maintain social distancing and reduces the number of touch points between preparation and serving of food. Many delivery programs have also instituted no touch/no interaction options, which further reduces risk.




Can I get COVID-19 from touching food or packaging exposed to coronavirus?


The risk of transfer of viruses is very low, based on current research. CDC, FDA and USDA are not aware of any reports at this time that suggest COVID-19 can be transmitted by food or food packaging. Current evidence shows the biggest risk of transmission of COVID-19 is being around individuals who are symptomatic. Food businesses should be following employee health policies and health department recommendations to keep these individuals home. To further minimize risk, handling food packaging should be followed by handwashing and/or using hand sanitizer.




What happens in your body if you do ingest coronavirus through food?


If you consumed food that is contaminated with coronavirus, your stomach acid should inactivate the virus since it is very acidic (pH 2.0). Even if your stomach acid did not inactivate the virus, there is no evidence the virus causing COVID-19 can start infecting through the gastrointestinal tract. The only possible way to get sick is if, during eating, the virus comes in contact with a specific type of respiratory cells. This scenario is highly unlikely and not concerning given what is known about modes of transmission currently discussed regarding COVID-19




Would I still be considered a close contact if my exposure was outside?


Yes. No matter the setting, if you were within 6 feet of a person with COVID-19 for a cummulative 15 minutes or more, you would be considered a close contact.




Would I be a close contact if I was wearing a face covering and the person with COVID-19 was wearing a face covering?


Yes. We know that the face coverings are not 100% effective at preventing transmission of COVID-19. Even if you were both wearing a face covering, if you were within 6 feet of someone with COVID-19 for a cummulative 15 minutes or more, you would still be considered a close contact.





Testing

Who can get tested in Missoula County?


Missoula City-County Health Department is not currently conducting testing for those who are not having symptoms unless you have been identifed as a close contact (see Key Terms) or if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms of COVID-19: Fever or chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Fatigue Muscle or body aches Headache New loss of taste or smell Sore throat Congestion or runny nose Nausea or vomiting Diarrhea Other testing sites can be found under the Testing tab at the top of the page.




Who can get tested in Missoula County?


Missoula City-County Health Department is not currently conducting testing for those who are not having symptoms unless you have been identifed as a close contact (see Key Terms) or if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms of COVID-19: Fever or chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Fatigue Muscle or body aches Headache New loss of taste or smell Sore throat Congestion or runny nose Nausea or vomiting Diarrhea Other testing sites can be found under the Testing tab at the top of the page.





Missoula City-County Health Department

301 W. Alder

Missoula, MT  59802

(406) 258-INFO - COVID-19 Information Line

  • Facebook
  • YouTube